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Cuneiform Tablet of Amar-Suen [King of Ur]

Clay tablet (43x51x15mm) with economic text and figures from the first year of the reign of King Amar-Suen. The impression on reverse with a pictorial cylinder seal depicting a seated figure is a rare, early example of pictorial printing.

Hubert de Burgh (d.1243), Chamberlain to King John and Justiciar of England

20 lines on vellum, 230x240mm, in brown ink, in a large well-written Romanesque hand, undated, c.1201. The fine green heraldic seal is attached by a striped linen cord and shows on the obverse three leopards passant and the legend "Sigill: Huberti: de: Burgo" and on the reverse a standing figure and the legend "Celo: Secretum." (Minimal wear and staining, with four tiny holes, but otherwise in excellent condition.) A very fine charter in Latin as chamberlain to King John by which Hubert de Burgh grants to the Cistercian House of Abbey Dore in Herefordshire the land at Linchoit which Henry II had given to the Abbey but which had come into Hubert's hands as governor of Herefordshire when King John gave him Grosmont and the land around it. The grant is conditional on four priests praying for ever for his soul and that of the king. Witnesses include John de Kilpac, Walter de Muchegros and Henry de Grosmont. [Maggs catalogue 977, item 68]

London Charter

Grant by Simon Bonde, citizen of London, and his wife Johanna, to Thomas son of Simon Dolseley, citizen and piperarius (pepperer or spicer) of London, of the rent from a tenement with its appurtenances in Cordwainer Street in the parish of St. Mary Aldermary. The list of seven witnesses includes John Not, Mayor of London in 1364, and Nicholas Chaucer. The list of witnesses is preceded by the statement that Simon Franceys is now Mayor of London, and Thomas de Brandon and Walter le Forestier, sheriffs. There is a note on the verso that the charter was read and enrolled in the Husting Court of Common Pleas on16 May

  1. 13.5 lines in Latin, on vellum, in a good hand, with flourished initial letter "S", of "Sciant". The original vellum seal tags are present but the seals are lacking. London, 3 May 30 Edward III.(1356). [Maggs catalogue]

Cologne Chronicle

An original leaf from "Cronica van der hilliger Stat van Coelle printed in 1499 by Johan Koelhoff in Cologne. Contemporary colouring." [Information from label affixed to mat.] Matted and framed between two sheets of Plexiglas, area visible: ca. 310x213 mm. Upper outside corner torn off (4x8 mm), lower outside corner creased with some flaking of paper. Recto: [p.?] CXX at head, 42 lines text printed in black, many letters embellished with red vertical strokes. 3 Portraits (2 of clerics and 1 of an emperor) printed in black and coloured yellow, blue, green, brown, and red; ca. 50x40mm. Verso: 44 lines text printed in black and embellished as above.

Map of the World

1 leaf engraved, with original outline and wash colour double hemisphere map consisting of two circles joined at the sides, with two additional smaller circles at the top and bottom centre(between the two larger circles), containing the orbits of the planets -with a border of astrological signs. The remainder of the leaf is illustrated with allegorical scenes. The coastline of North America is not drawn above California, New Zealand coast is deficient, Australian coast is deficient and attached to New Guinea. Visscher/Stupendahl Rotterdam 1663, 1680 or later-corresponds to description of 1663 version in Shirley, 431. Removed from a
Dutch Bible. 12x17.5".

Henry Crease collection

  • CA UVICARCH SC560
  • Fonds
  • ca. 1860

Stole is made of red felt and is embroidered with a bead floral design. Each side measures approximately 60 cm. Crease likely acquired the stole in the 1860s while he traveled with Supreme Court Judge Matthew Baillie Begbie on a circuit throughout British Columbia, and it was presumably passed down to several family members. A plate accompanies the stole, which reads:

"The stole was presented to the Law Library by Miss Laura Lindley Roff, class of 1984. She told us that it had been presented to her great grandfather, Mr. Justice Crease, when he was on circuit in the interior of the province. Miss Roff told us that she had been told that the Aboriginal people thought the black judicial robes were dull and needed brightening."

Crease, Henry Pering Pellew, 1823-1905

Incunabulum

Incunabulum, 31.5 X 43.5 cm, 1477, leaf from Pantheologia of Reynerus de Pisis. Includes the following description: 'A page from the Pantheologia of Reynerus de Pisis printed at Nuremburg by Anton Koberger in 1477. With the invention of moveable type in the middle of the fifteenth century, books were printed on paper and in unlimited quantity. These books printed before 1501, known as "incunabula", imitated the forms of contemporary manuscripts. Since readers were accustomed to the decoration of manuscripts, coloured initials were added to the printed page by hand.'

James I, Document

The file consists of a court record from the beginning of the reign of James I. It passed through private hands. The document is in Latin court hand and notes the transfer of land from Thomas and Robert Whitney to a knight. Paleographic assessment needed.

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