Collection SC273 - Yukio Ozaki collection

Title and statement of responsibility area

Title proper

Yukio Ozaki collection

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Collection

Reference code

CA UVICARCH SC273

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Issuing jurisdiction and denomination (philatelic)

Dates of creation area

Date(s)

  • 1920 - 1933 (Creation)

Physical description area

Physical description

2 cm of textual records

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Archival description area

Name of creator

Biographical history

A democratic politician who was elected to the Japanese House of Representatives a total of 25 times and is considered the "father of parliamentary politics" in that country. Originally a journalist, Ozaki joined the government of Okuma Shigenobu. When Okuma resigned in 1881 owing to the cabinet's failure to adopt his radical proposals for the creation of a new constitution, Ozaki followed him into opposition. In 1898 Ozaki was back in the government, as education minister in the new, and short-lived, Okuma cabinet. He was forced to resign, however, after a slip of the tongue in which he referred to the imperial Japanese state as a republic. From 1903 to 1912 he was mayor of Tokyo, and in 1912 he led the rank-and-file members of the Friends of Constitutional Government (Rikken Seiyukai) party into the streets to rally popular support against the oligarchical cabinet of the former general Katsura Taro. Within a few months the movement that Ozaki had helped form led to the fall of Katsura's government and the gradual creation of a cabinet responsible to the majority party in the Japanese Diet, or parliament. In 1915, while serving as minister of justice in Okuma's second cabinet, Ozaki denounced the bribery and corruption carried on by Okuma during the election. He thereafter refused to affiliate with any faction or party but remained until his death a powerful force, always fighting for the expansion of democratic politics in Japan. He was especially active in the struggle for universal manhood suffrage, which was established in 1925.

Custodial history

Scope and content

The collection consists of a 325 page carbon typescript autobiography (with 25 pages of endnotes) in translation. Personal and political reminiscences and observations covering childhood, period as a newspaper editor in Meiji (1879); Mayor of Tokyo, and political and parliamentary activities. The original text was written in 1920, and the translation, possibly edited by John Soffell, perhaps in the 1930's.

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Description record identifier

yukio-ozaki-collection

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Dates of creation, revision and deletion

Revised by JF, August 9, 2013.

Language of description

  • English

Script of description

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